Life Story of Steve Jobs

 

Early Life

 

Steve jobs was born in San Francisco, California in 1955.He was an adopted Child by a coupled named Paul and Clara jobs.Steve Jobs Biological parents was uneducated so they decided put Steve Jobs for adoption.She felt strong on give only to an well-educated family and found a lawyer and his wife.Paul(lawyer) and Clara wanted a baby girl so Biological mother in the waiting list.She got a boy and paul also accepted to adopt the baby boy.Later they moved to Mountain View, CA in 1961.While his father was into repairing cars, Steve loved working on electronics instead.

 

Education

 

Jobs attended Homestead High School and began his first year there along with Bill Fernandez.In the mid-1970s, Steve discovered Shakespeare, Dylan Thomas, and the Classic literary stuff, which prompted him to take creative writing lessons.He was interested in Electronics, art and literature.In senior year he was best friends with Wozniak and his girlfriend Chrisann Brennan, who was an art major.After High School Jobs enrolled at Reed College in Portland Oregon in 1972.It was one of the Expensive College in Portland and his working class parents saving spent on his college tuition.After 6 months jobs didn’t see the value in it and don’t want to spend all of his parents money in it so he decided to drop out after only one semester itself.Then he didn’t have an drone room so he slept on floor in friends home and continued to attend an auditing class but he was not an official student.He interested to attend Caligraphy course and learned about sans and sans-serif typefaces.He returned an coke bottle for 5Cents for his food.

“If I had never dropped in on that single calligraphy course in college, the Mac would have never had multiple typefaces or proportionally spaced fonts.”

Windows just copies the mac its likely that no personel computer would have them.

 

Apple Foundation

 

Jobs and Steve Wozniak met in 1971, when a mutual friend introduced 21 year-old Wozniak to 16 year-old Jobs. In 1976, when Jobs was only twenty-one, they invented the first Apple computer and founded Apple computer in Job’s parents garage.By early 77 a prototype of Apple computer was ready and later that year Jobs and Wozniak introduced Apple II at West Coast computer faire. It was the first consumer product sold by Apple computers and one of the highly successful mass-produced microcomputer product. The primary designer was Steve Wozniak. As Jobs became more and more successful in Apple, his personal relationship grows more complex.In 1983, Jobs hired John Sculley from Pepsico to serve as Apple’s CEO.In 1984 jobs introduces macintosh.First year with sculley was gone well and later the visions of the future began to diverged and eventually they had an falling out.Board of directors of apple company sided with sculley idea and jobs was fired on 1985 at the age of 30.

 

Next and Pixar Company

 

After fired from apple he don’t know what to do for few months then he realised that still he loves what he doing.

The Heaviness of being successful was replaced by the lightness of being a Beginner again,less sure about everything

Jobs founded NeXT Computer in 1985, with $7 million. In 1986, Jobs bought The Graphics Group (later renamed Pixar) from Lucasfilm’s computer graphics division for the price of $10 million.Pixar is the successful animation company in the world.The first film produced by the partnership, Toy Story, with Jobs credited as executive producer.Apple Computer announced an intention to acquire NeXT on December 20, 1996.Apple paid $429 million in cash.Jobs returned to apple and in 2000 Jobs took the CEO position as a permanent assignment.

Fired from the apple was the best thing ever happened to me

 

Inventions

 

  • Apple introduced the new iBook, May 1, 2001 in Cupertino, California.
  • The iPod MP3 music player was unveiled Oct. 23, 2001, at an event in Cupertino, California. The device held up to 1,000 songs.
  • The Macintosh iBook laptop computer was released in 2002.
  • Apple launched the iTunes Music Store on April 28, 2003, with songs for 99 cents. Apple CEO Steve Jobs described the store as a way for consumers to legally download music while protecting the rights of the artists and music companies. The store featured over 200,000 songs.
  • The new Apple Computer iPod mini is displayed during the Macworld Expo trade show on January 6, 2004, in San Francisco, California. The half-inch-thick iPod mini, the size of a business card, has 4 gigabytes of storage.
  • The iPod Nano on Oct. 20, 2005.
  • A iMac with Intel Core Duo processor is seen on display at the 2006 Macworld on Jan. 10, 2006, in San Francisco, California.
  • Steve Jobs holds up the first ever iPhone, which was introduced at Macworld on Jan. 9, 2007, in San Francisco, California. The iPhone combines what was described at the time as “a mobile phone, a widescreen iPod with touch controls and an Internet communications device with the ability to use email, web browsing, maps and searching.”
  • Apple TV is seen on display in an Apple store March 23, 2007, in New York City.
  • Customers celebrate after buying the first generation iPad at the Apple shop on George Street on May 28, 2010, in Sydney, Australia. Apple’s new tablet media device went on sale in nine countries around the world in May 2010 following its launch in the United States in April earlier that year.

 

Health issues

 

In October 2003, Jobs was diagnosed with cancer.In mid-2004, he announced to his employees that he had a cancerous tumor in his Pancreas.The prognosis for pancreatic cancer is usually very poor.Jobs stated that he had a rare, much less aggressive type, known as islet cell neuroendocrine tumor.The doctor told it was an rare case of cancer incurable and he should expect to live no longer than 3-6 months.Later he gone to biopsy and put a needle to get few cells from tumors.After seeing the tumors in microscope the doctor started crying and said it is curable with surgery.By the time he underwent the surgery that ok to remove his tumor successfully.

 

Death

 

In Jan 2011 Tim cook was made the permanent CEO of Apple company.Steve Jobs died at his home in Palo Alto California on the afternoon of October 5th, 2011.Steve Jobs died peacefully with his family surrounding him.

Thanks for Reading

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How Popular Websites Look at the time of Start Up

1. Google.
The search engine giant Google was founded by Stanford PhD students Larry Page and Sergey Brin and launched sept 4, 1998. At the time of start up the founders are not familiar with HTML they came up with simple quick design.
1_google

2. Facebook
Facebook the famous social networking site with the active users of 900 million across the world started with the name Thefacebook. It was founded by Mark Zuckerberg, student of Harvard University on Feb 4, 2004. The image at the top left corner of interface is digitally manipulated photo of American actor Al Pacino.
2_facebook

3. Youtube
Youtube is a video sharing website founded by Steve Chen, Chad Hurley and Jawed Karim and launched Feb 14, 2005. Later, in November 2006, it was bought by Google for US$1.65 billion. The first video uploaded to the site was created by one of founders, Jawed Karim and was titled “Me at the zoo“. It was 19 secs clip of him in front of elephants at the San Diego Zoo.
3_youtube

4. Yahoo!
An acronym for “Yet Another Hierarchical Officious Oracle,” Yahoo was the product of another Stanford duo, Jerry Yang and David Filo. In March 1995 the site was heralded as the first online navigational guide to the web. The original interface featured a simple search bar and hyperlinks to other websites, but soon became a sleek, personalized news website.
4_yahoo

Dizzying But Invisible Depth – Complex stuffs behind the simple machines..!

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It Seems to be very large post but its worth to read. A wonderful essay by Google Engineer.

You just went to the Google home page.

Simple, isn’t it?

What just actually happened?

Well, when you know a bit of about how browsers work, it’s not quite that simple. You’ve just put into play HTTP, HTML, CSS, ECMAscript, and more. Those are actually such incredibly complex technologies that they’ll make any engineer dizzy if they think about them too much, and such that no single company can deal with that entire complexity.

Let’s simplify.

You just connected your computer to www.google.com.

Simple, isn’t it?

What just actually happened?

Well, when you know a bit about how networks work, it’s not quite that simple. You’ve just put into play DNS, TCP, UDP, IP, Wifi, Ethernet, DOCSIS, OC, SONET, and more. Those are actually such incredibly complex technologies that they’ll make any engineer dizzy if they think about them too much, and such that no single company can deal with that entire complexity.

Let’s simplify.

You just typed www.google.com in the location bar of your browser.

Simple, isn’t it?

What just actually happened?

Well, when you know a bit about how operating systems work, it’s not quite that simple. You’ve just put into play a kernel, a USB host stack, an input dispatcher, an event handler, a font hinter, a sub-pixel rasterizer, a windowing system, a graphics driver, and more, all of those written in high-level languages that get processed by compilers, linkers, optimizers, interpreters, and more. Those are actually such incredibly complex technologies that they’ll make any engineer dizzy if they think about them too much, and such that no single company can deal with that entire complexity.

Let’s simplify.

You just pressed a key on your keyboard.

Simple, isn’t it?

What just actually happened?

Well, when you know about bit about how input peripherals work, it’s not quite that simple. You’ve just put into play a power regulator, a debouncer, an input multiplexer, a USB device stack, a USB hub stack, all of that implemented in a single chip. That chip is built around thinly sliced wafers of highly purified single-crystal silicon ingot, doped with minute quantities of other atoms that are blasted into the crystal structure, interconnected with multiple layers of aluminum or copper, that are deposited according to patterns of high-energy ultraviolet light that are focused to a precision of a fraction of a micron, connected to the outside world via thin gold wires, all inside a packaging made of a dimensionally and thermally stable resin. The doping patterns and the interconnects implement transistors, which are grouped together to create logic gates. In some parts of the chip, logic gates are combined to create arithmetic and bitwise functions, which are combined to create an ALU. In another part of the chip, logic gates are combined into bistable loops, which are lined up into rows, which are combined with selectors to create a register bank. In another part of the chip, logic gates are combined into bus controllers and instruction decoders and microcode to create an execution scheduler. In another part of the chip, they’re combined into address and data multiplexers and timing circuitry to create a memory controller. There’s even more. Those are actually such incredibly complex technologies that they’ll make any engineer dizzy if they think about them too much, and such that no single company can deal with that entire complexity.

Can we simplify further?

In fact, very scarily, no, we can’t. We can barely comprehend the complexity of a single chip in a computer keyboard, and yet there’s no simpler level. The next step takes us to the software that is used to design the chip’s logic, and that software itself has a level of complexity that requires to go back to the top of the loop.

Today’s computers are so complex that they can only be designed and manufactured with slightly less complex computers. In turn the computers used for the design and manufacture are so complex that they themselves can only be designed and manufactured with slightly less complex computers. You’d have to go through many such loops to get back to a level that could possibly be re-built from scratch.

Once you start to understand how our modern devices work and how they’re created, it’s impossible to not be dizzy about the depth of everything that’s involved, and to not be in awe about the fact that they work at all, when Murphy’s law says that they simply shouldn’t possibly work.

For non-technologists, this is all a black box. That is a great success of technology: all those layers of complexity are entirely hidden and people can use them without even knowing that they exist at all. That is the reason why many people can find computers so frustrating to use: there are so many things that can possibly go wrong that some of them inevitably will, but the complexity goes so deep that it’s impossible for most users to be able to do anything about any error.

That is also why it’s so hard for technologists and non-technologists to communicate together: technologists know too much about too many layers and non-technologists know too little about too few layers to be able to establish effective direct communication. The gap is so large that it’s not even possible any more to have a single person be an intermediate between those two groups, and that’s why e.g. we end up with those convoluted technical support call centers and their multiple tiers. Without such deep support structures, you end up with the frustrating situation that we see when end users have access to a bug database that is directly used by engineers: neither the end users nor the engineers get the information that they need to accomplish their goals.

That is why the mainstream press and the general population has talked so much about Steve Jobs’ death and comparatively so little about Dennis Ritchie’s: Steve’s influence was at a layer that most people could see, while Dennis’ was much deeper. On the one hand, I can imagine where the computing world would be without the work that Jobs did and the people he inspired: probably a bit less shiny, a bit more beige, a bit more square. Deep inside, though, our devices would still work the same way and do the same things. On the other hand, I literally can’t imagine where the computing world would be without the work that Ritchie did and the people he inspired. By the mid 80s, Ritchie’s influence had taken over, and even back then very little remained of the pre-Ritchie world.

Finally, last but not least, that is why our patent system is broken: technology has done such an amazing job at hiding its complexity that the people regulating and running the patent system are barely even aware of the complexity of what they’re regulating and running. That’s the ultimate bikeshedding: just like the proverbial discussions in the town hall about a nuclear power plant end up being about the paint color for the plant’s bike shed, the patent discussions about modern computing systems end up being about screen sizes and icon ordering, because in both cases those are the only aspect that the people involved in the discussion are capable of discussing, even though they are irrelevant to the actual function of the overall system being discussed.

Source: Thanks to Google engineer Jean-Baptiste Quéru

tsu – New Social Network shares revenue with users. !

Tsu was the company founded in 2013 by tech entrepreneurs Sebastian Sobczak, Drew Sobczak, Drew Ginsburg, Thibault Boullenger, and Jonathan Lewin which was located at New York.

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There are many social networks Facebook, Google+ and a new comer Ello. But tsu is different from others it has some new ideas. It promises users to pay for their contribution and sharing original content. I hope this might be a great rival for Facebook in future. Tsu founder Sebastian Sobczak says:

Why should anyone commercially benefit from someone else’s image, likeness and work giving no financial return to the owner?

So what does this mean for business influencers and brands? Tsu keeps 10 percent of the revenue it earns from its ads to maintain the platform. It gives the other 90 percent to its content creators and the people that share posts.

How to Join?

To join in this new social network you need short code i.e invite from other users. Create your new profile in tsu. Posting content, Friend Request, Followers are similar to other social networks. Click this link to join tsu.

How it allocate revenue?

From $100 revenue, $90 is shared with users. If four users have shared and re-shared content, the revenue is split like this:

The original content creator receives 50 percent of the remaining $90; in this case, $45. The first user to share the content gets 33.3 percent (one third) of the original $90 generated. In this case, $29.70.

The second degree user, who shares the re-shared content, receives 11.1 percent (1/3 of 1/3 = 1/9) of the original $90 generated. In this case $9.99. The third user (think your third degree connection) receives 3.70 percent (1/3 of 1/3 of 1/3 = 1/27) of the original $90 generated. In this case $3.33.

You can redeem your money when it reaches minimum of $100. tsu will send cheque to your home. Its a very cool way of sharing revenue – surely something that other companies might be interested in copying.

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To ensure a safe and authentic community, Tsu prohibit users from earning money through illegitimate means:

  • Any attempt to game the system or impersonate others Spam, such as begging for follows, aggressive hash tagging, posting on strangers’ walls.
  • Inappropriate content, including violent, discriminatory, unlawful, hateful, sexually explicit or pornographic material.

Its an pretty cool idea from Sebastian Sobczak. To experience this new platform Join Tsu.